Category: Fitness
women-should-workout-different-from-men-dr-jade-teta-fit-to-succeed-podcast

Women should workout differently to men? – Episode 50 with Dr Jade Teta

Summary

In many aspects of life women and men have a basic right to be equal! However, the debate still continues as to whether or not women should workout different from men. Both genders certainly can train the same if they wish, but is that the most effective thing to be doing in terms of overall health and in trying to optimise results? Dr Jade Teta rejoins us for a special show on our 50th episode to answer some important questions on gender-specific hormonal physiology and how this can be tied into exercise and fitness training.

Guest biography

Dr Jade Teta is a highly experienced personal trainer of over 25 years. He has produced numerous video-based workouts that are used by hundreds of thousands all over the world. Jade has a degree in biochemistry and is a qualified physician. His speciality is in a subset of medicine called naturopathic medicine. If you compare him to your family doctor, but instead of using drugs and surgery first, Jade chooses to use drugs as a second choice over other natural remedies and behaviours. He is also an expert in nutrition, exercise and supplementation. Jade describes his speciality as ‘integrative endocrinology.’ This is the study of hormones & metabolism. The integrative part just means that he combines and balances both conventional and alternative methods. Most of Jade’s career has been focused on helping the most difficult metabolic cases to be able to successfully lose weight.

You can learn more about jade by visiting his very informative website.

Dr Jade is the author of several books, including:

Lose Weight Here: The metabolic secret to target stubborn fat and fix your problem areas

The Metabolic Effect Diet: Eat more, workout less, and actually lose weight while you rest

Episode content: Women should workout different from men

We think this episode is going to be one of the great classics on the Fit to Succeed show. Don’t miss out, be sure to make time to listen to the full show. We cover a whole range of fascinating and important topics related to gender training considerations, especially in reference to the hormonal physiology of male and female bodies. Fitness trainers listen up and alter your practice accordingly! Women should workout different from men.

  • 2:04 Why gender is often overlooked when giving fitness advice
  • 7:45 The impact of dominant male hormones on fitness development
  • 12:12 The circadian hormonal cycle for males
  • 17:05 Optimising male circadian habits to improve weight loss efforts
  • 23:33 The impact of dominant female hormones on fitness development
  • 42:46 Women who suffer PMS and difficult menstruation may adapt their fitness training schedule
  • 46:54 The impact of menses and menopause on fitness, diet and cravings

This is the second time Dr Jade has been on the Fit to Succeed show. His first episode back in season 1 was also excellent. We discussed Calories, hormones, and metabolism as fundamental factors in managing body fat loss.

Connect with Dr Jade of social media

@jadeteta

@jadeteta

@jadeteta

Rate the show

If you enjoyed this episode, then please rate the show, give a short review, and share it with your friends so they can benefit from this free expert information. Your comments and feedback are always welcome. Please subscribe to the podcast on iTunes or the video series on YouTube so you will receive each update immediately upon release. It also helps the show rank higher and reach more people.

For other great episodes and expert guests on the Fit to Succeed show, visit our full podcast library.

personal-coaching-supersedes-personal-training-bobby-cappuccio-podcast

Personal coaching supersedes personal training – Episode 25 with Bobby Cappuccio

Summary

Coaching is not just another word for training! Becoming a personal fitness coach requires a change in our approach to client support and behaviour change. Leading behaviour coach and personal trainer, Bobby Cappuccio, shares the important differences and will be sure to change your perspective.

Guest biography

Bobby began coaching shortly after a paradigm shift occurred in his life. He was in his early twenties and a certified personal trainer. Born with a severe facial deformity and diagnosed with Tourette syndrome at age nine, he suffered abominable abuse in and out of his home until he stumbled upon a marvel: exercise. He discovered that by redirecting his focus, he could affect positive change in not only his life but in the lives of the people he in turn trained. In helping others, he was in fact helping himself. In sharing his discoveries over the years, he became a world-renowned speaker, author and behaviour change coach.

As co-founder of PTA Global, former head of training and development at David Barton gym, former director of professional development at the National Academy of Sports Medicine (N.A.S.M.), Director of Coaching at the Institute of Motion (IOM) and content curator for PTontheNet, Bobby’s reach runs wide. Bobby has worked with Hilton Hotels, Virgin Active, Fitness First, 24hr Fitness, David Lloyd Leisure and multiple small businesses nationally and abroad. Bobby travels the world impacting lives, inspiring positive change and growth in individuals and companies alike. He has presented at business and fitness conferences across the globe including IDEA, Filex, CanFitPro, FitPro, IHRSA, Pure Fitness Asia, Perform Better, Equinox, Gold’s Gym International, Lifetime Family Fitness etc. helping to develop top-notch fitness professionals.

Fit to Succeed episode: Personal coaching

In this episode on personal coaching we cover:

  • Bobby’s back story that brought him into the fitness and personal training industry
  • the definition of coaching
  • how personal training is connected to coaching
  • the concept of cognitive dissonance and how this can impact fitness objectives
  • how confirmation bias can lead to less informed choices and limit the potential for change

If you enjoy this episode, then please rate the show and share it with your friends so they can benefit from this free expert information. Your comments and feedback are always welcome. Please subscribe to the podcast on iTunes or the video series here on YouTube so you will receive each update immediately upon release. To enjoy more engaging expert interviews, please visit our full podcast library.

Website: www.robertcappuccio.com

Connect with Bobby on social media

Facebook @TheRobertCappuccio

Instagram @bobbycappuccio

Twitter @bobbycappuccio

Bonus video

Here is a short 5-minute bonus video that we recorded with Bobby, that offers some extra ideas and concepts to help.

motivation-and-confidence-fitness-trainers-pete-cohen-fit-to-succeed-podcast

Motivation and confidence for fitness trainers – Episode 19 with Pete Cohen

Summary

Health and fitness professionals are human too! It may come as a surprise that many in the fitness industry still struggle with a lack of motivation and confidence and maybe even a lack of self-belief. Sometimes developing and maintaining a high level of fitness is a means to overcoming those personal limitations. However, there is another way…learn to motivate yourself, begin an action plan to gradually increase in confidence and self-belief for true success. World-leading expert and inspirator, Pete Cohen, joins us on the Fit to Succeed show and shares vital insights into how we can build our psychological muscles!

Guest biography

Pete Cohen is one of the world’s leading keynote speakers. Hundreds of thousands of people from all over the world have been motivated and inspired by Pete’s presentations. He has been dedicated to supporting organisations and the people within them to flourish for over 25 years.

Pete coaches business leaders, executives, corporate teams and sporting stars to achieve their best. He has worked with companies such as IBM, Boots, Pfizer, Robert Half International, BAA, Royal Bank of Scotland, Boehringer Ingelheim and Thomas Cook. He has professionally impacted on the lives of thousands of people worldwide. Pete focuses on the importance of having a strong belief in yourself.

He is the author of 17 published books, several of which have been best-sellers across the world, including Shut the Duck UpHabit BustingLife DIY and Sort Your Life Out. He has also presented his own show on TV called The Coach and was the resident Life Coach on GMTV for 12 years. Pete’s background is in psychology and sports science. He specialises in taking self-help and personal development to the masses in a way that is easy for people to understand and apply. Working in sports performance coaching, Pete has helped world class sporting stars reach their peak performance. Notable clients include Sally Gunnell, Ronnie O’Sullivan, Ellen MacArthur, Roger Black, the Kent Cricket Team and the Arsenal Football team.

motivation-and-confidence-pete-cohen-fit-to-succeed
Pete Cohen – the Inspirator

Episode Content: Motivation and confidence

In this episode with Pete Cohen we discuss some intriguing topics and draw out some fascinating insights, including:

  • what motivated Pete to become a fitness professional
  • what is ‘self help’ and why do we need it?
  • how to ensure we receive help from qualified coaches
  • actions for developing confidence and self-belief
  • how to shift from a negative relationship with exercise/diet to a more positive one

Website: www.petecohen.com

motivation confidence & self belief

Connect with Pete on social media

Facebook @Itspetecohen

Instagram @petecohen_

Twitter @petecohen_

If you enjoy this episode about motivation confidence & self-belief, then please rate the show and share it with your friends so they can benefit from this free expert information. Your comments and feedback are always welcome. Please subscribe to the podcast on iTunes or the video series on YouTube so you will receive each update immediately upon release. To enjoy more engaging interviews, visit our full podcast library.

Episode links

During episode 19 Pete mentioned a range of different books, experts and talks that you can find out more about by following the links below:

Mel Robbins TEDX talk: How to stop screwing yourself over

Episode 11 Fit to Succeed podcast with Pete’s past fitness colleague, Lincoln Bryden, a leading group exercise expert

Book recommendations:

Think and grow rich by Napoleon Hill

The Heroes Journey by Joseph Campbell

Pete Cohen’s Mi365 podcast

Bonus video

This short bonus interview was recorded in addition to the main interview. Pete shares some quick thoughts to help those who need some ideas in a hurry! Enjoy.

exercise-throughout-pregnancy-jenny-burrell-fit-to-succeed-podcast

Exercise throughout pregnancy – Episode 16 with Jenny Burrell

Summary

In this episode, Jenny Burrell champions the health and fitness needs of women keeping fit during pregnancy and the postnatal period. Pregnancy does not have to become a time to rest and ‘put your feet up’ only, it can also be a time to continue enjoying your fitness habits and maintaining exercise throughout pregnancy. Jenny is passionate about empowering women to function, move, and enjoy life during and after pregnancy.

Biography

Jenny Burrell is the head of Burrell Education, one of the UK’s leading-edge educators in the field of modern Pregnancy, Post Baby, 3rd Age (Peri-to Post-Menopause) and Female Fitness. Burrell Education the UK’s only endorsed, accredited and licensed education provider dedicated to solely to these specific special population groups.

Jenny states her mission is to help mothers/women and pre & postnatal fitness professionals to realize the unlimited forward-facing possibilities for creating intuitive, real-life programming. She loves to develop strategies that quite simply get results. But most importantly, Jenny helps women re-connect with the power of who they really are!

She originally qualified with a BSc in biochemistry and microbiology. A lifelong learner, Jenny has obtained over 25 professional certifications in fitness, therapy, and wellness.

Episode content: Exercise throughout pregnancy

Some of the topics discussed during this engaging episode on keeping fit and continuing with exercise throughout pregnancy include:

  • Jenny’s fascinating journey to becoming a fitness professional that specializes in female fitness and wellness
  • a breakthrough in modern, pregnancy-related fitness advice
  • the changes in fitness and functional needs across the 3 trimesters of pregnancy
  • how the core and pelvic floor muscles are integrated in their function
  • and many more tips and ideas for keeping fit during pregnancy and female health

If you enjoy this episode, then please rate the show and share it with your friends so they can benefit from this free expert information. Your comments and feedback are always welcome. Please subscribe to the podcast on iTunes or the video series on YouTube so you will receive each update immediately upon release. To enjoy more engaging expert interviews, visit the full podcast library.

Connect with Jenny:

To learn more about Jenny and look into the wide range of specialist pre and postnatal training courses available through her website: www.burrelleducation.com

Social media:

Facebook @burrelleducation

Instagram @Burrell_education

Twitter @MsJennyBurrell

Episode links

During the episode, Jenny mentions 2 specific individuals in the functional movement fields that helped improve her skills for keeping fit during pregnancy. If you would like to learn more about the concepts they teach follow the links below:

Paul Chek, founder of the Chek Institute and his Primal Pattern Movements course

Thomas Myers and his Anatomy Trains that teach regarding the myofacial lines

Bonus video

We also recorded a short bonus quick fire question round with Jenny. Again she offers some helpful thoughts and applicable tips. Enjoy!

Personal Training students feature in International women’s football match

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The Algarve Cup 2019 tournament

The 2019 Algarve Cup was the 26th edition of the international women’s invitational football tournament held in Portugal between 27th February to 6th March.

During the tournament, on 4th March, Scotland (FIFA ranking 20th) played against Iceland (FIFA ranking 22nd) in an exciting matchup that delivered 5 goals in total with Scotland taking the victory. The full match reports, can be found on the Scottish FA website and also the Icelandic FA website.

In addition to the exciting game and football talent on show, there was another lesser known fact about this specific football match. There were also four personal training students/graduates from the same school playing alongside each other during the match.

Icelandic football team:

Image result for iceland flag

Playing for Iceland, Dagný Brynjarsdóttir was the very first graduate of the Nordic Personal Training Certification (NPTC), obtaining her European Level 4 personal training qualification in January 2018. Regarding her learning experience, Dagný said: “The NPTC is a great programme which gave me the opportunity to study while pursuing my professional football career.”

Sigriður Garðarsdóttir, also playing for Iceland, is the most recent graduate of the NPTC programme (per date of publication). She achieved her Level 4 personal training qualification in February 2019, just a few days before this international game with Scotland. In respect to her journey to becoming a certified personal trainer, Sigriður rated the NPTC course as “Excellent,” and that she would “recommend the course.”

Needless to say, here at Nordic Fitness Education, and our mother training company Keilir Academy, we are very proud of both of these personal training graduates. We wish them continued success both on the football field and through their educational achievements as certified personal trainers.

Glódís Viggosdóttir, who was selected in the starting 11 for this match, is currently halfway through the NPTC programme. Similarly to her football skills, she is performing very well in her studies to date.

Scottish football team:

Image result for scotland flag

Finally, on the Scottish side, Fiona Brown, who played in the second half of the game, is also halfway through her NPTC studies. Fiona is proving to be a very capable student as she works towards her Level 4 personal training qualification.

The team here at Nordic Fitness Education will continue to support both Glódís and Fiona as they work hard towards the completion of their Level 4 personal training certifications. No doubt they are gaining valuable knowledge that will help support them as they continue to play football at an international level.

We wish all four women the very best as they continue with their national football careers.

Could you become a certified personal trainer?

Undertaking a career in personal training can be a great option for those who are seeking a secondary field of expertise to focus their professional careers. Whether you work in sport or perhaps in some other field of expertise, why don’t you find out more about the Nordic Personal Training Certificate.

The NPTC programme has been fully accredited by Europe Active to meet all the required professional fitness industry standards across the European region. NPTC graduates are eligible for registration with the European Register of Exercise Professionals.

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Perk up your posture

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We are living in a modern world that often requires us to engage in repetitive movements. Often we may need to adopt long-term fixed positions that impact on human posture and movement capacity. Office employment, manufacturing work, packaging lines, schooling, computer gaming, driving, commuting, long distant flights and many other elements of modern living dictate our set bodily positions on a daily basis. As human posture adapts to our modern environment the knock-on effect on our movement capacity can have significant negative implications on physical fitness, movement purity, and even athletic performance.

posture
Impact of prolonged seating at a computer work station

What is posture?

Posture has been defined as the ‘attitude or position of the body’ which should be able to fulfil three important functions:

  1. Maintaining the alignment of the body’s segments in any static position: supine, prone, sitting, quadruped, and standing
  2. Anticipating change that will allow for engagement of voluntary, goal-directed movements such as reaching and stepping
  3. Reacting quickly to unexpected perturbations or disturbances in balance or centre of gravity

This clearly indicates that the concept of posture includes both a static and an active/dynamic state of being. Maintaining effective posture is vital for balance and control of the body when motionless as well as during a wide variety of different types of human movement. To provide for the long-term health of the spine, shoulders, hips, knees, ankles and feet, developing the ability to stay within optimal postural parameters is a desirable goal at all times when holding static positions or moving in three dimensions. This is much easier said than done as postural position is predominantly controlled through subconscious neural controls and is rarely at the forefront of our daily thinking.Anatomical anterior posture

Male anterior
Anatomical anterior posture

Human movement

The conscious mind is usually preoccupied with goal-oriented movement, rather than the exact positioning and motion required for each specific joint involved in a larger chain reaction of physical movement. Thank goodness for that! Can you imagine trying to apply your conscious mind to control every muscle, joint and body part to synchronize different joint angles, tempo’s, range of movement, joint impact, joint loads, and other biomechanical responses just to perform the basic function of walking? The conscious mind boggles at such complexity. Thankfully our more powerful subconscious brain can manage all of these immensely detailed neural functions without our focused mind needing to be invested in this.

The body has numerous sensory receptors, called proprioceptors, found within the muscles and joints that help to provide neural feedback regarding one’s own limb and spinal position, speed of movement, and the forces passing through the muscles and joints in order to subconsciously control any necessary response. Perhaps the most well known of the primary 6 categories are the muscle spindle and the Golgi tendon organ. All proprioceptors constantly gather vital information on behalf of the nervous system to ensure we are fully aware of and can respond to our own daily movements and the forces that we are subjected to constantly throughout each day.

Sway posture
Sway posture with altered spinal alignment

Muscular imbalance

Where joint or muscular dysfunction has crept in unawares, resulting in posture and movement purity corruption, subconscious human movement may no longer fall within an optimal range. Such adulterated movement will likely lead to a shift in centre of gravity, faulty loading through the muscles and uneven forces passing through the joints (see sway posture example above). If left unchecked the chronic application of such faulty movement can lead to muscular tension, fascial adhesions, joint wear and tear and the gradual breakdown of important structural tissues. These undesirable, dysfunctional outcomes can be managed and reversed if they are identified, and a suitable corrective strategy is introduced and applied.

A corrective strategy should involve a carefully planned process of adjustment and relearning of motor control. An effective way to support a client and plan to correct their faulty movement patterns is as follows:

  • carry out a postural assessment and identify any existing faulty positioning
  • carefully assess movement purity and identify any visible restrictions
  • determine the dysfunctional muscles based upon the posture and movement assessment observations
  • mobilise joint and muscle range of motion where limitations exist
  • select relevant activation exercises for any under-active muscles within the kinetic chain
  • apply an appropriate level of intensity within each stage to ensure good position and technique are always paramount
  • gradually progress the physical challenge towards optimal function, provided movement purity is maintained

It would be impossible in a simple blog to cover all variations in postural position and movement dysfunction. But here is an example of a common and relatively simple dysfunction to address.

The Flat Back posture

Flat back posture
Hyper kyphosis of the thoracic spine

Joints position:

  • Thoracic spine in a flexed position – resulting in protracted shoulder girdle
  • Cervical spine in an extended position – resulting in forward head carriage
  • Pelvis is in a posterior tilted position
  • Hips are in an extended position

Overactive, shortened muscles that most likely require stretching:

  • Hamstring group
  • Rectus abdominis
  • Upper trapezius
  • Sternocleidomastoid
Stretches for kyphosis

Underactive, lengthened muscles that most likely need strengthening:

  • Mid-trapezius and rhomboids
  • Neck flexors
  • Lumbar erector spinae
  • Iliopsoas
Exercise for kyphosis

These stretches and exercises may become part of an effective workout preparation strategy for 10 minutes before each gym session. They can even be done as part of light activity on a rest/recovery day. Committing to the regular application of such a strategy can be a powerful tool in resolving postural imbalances. This will, in turn, improve functional daily movement, which ultimately will lead to better performance in the long term.

Check out our course

We teach similar posture and movement analysis content within our flagship certification, the Nordic Personal Trainer Certificate, within the Testing and Movement Screening module. To find out more, click the link above or visit our website https://www.nordicfitnesseducation.com

High Intensity Intermittent Training (HIIT) science – fact or fiction?

High-intensity training has been a hot media topic over the last couple of years, from magazine and newspaper articles to prime time television shows on the BBC. It seems that the idea of achieving as much benefit within less time is a solution that appeals to many people in a world where available workout time is at a premium. However, the idea of using higher intensity training to boost physical benefits is certainly not a new one. Early research by scientists like Bahr, Tremblay and Tabata, all of which have become renowned in this field, date back to the early 1990’s. Take note that not everything published in the media or blogosphere on high-intensity training is justified by the scientific literature. Fitness professionals and enthusiasts often use the basic concept of high-intensity interval training and embellish the truth a little, perhaps unknowingly, to suit their own desired outcome. The intent in this post is to glean the facts around this popular training method from the scientific literature so that you are correctly informed going forward in your utilisation of HIIT as a training modality.

Group circuit
  • Tremblay showed in 1994 that a 15 week HIIT programme reduced total skinfolds 14 mm subcutaneous body fat compared to a 20-week endurance training (ET) programme that only reduced by 4mm total skinfolds. The HIIT protocol being 3.5 times more effective.  The ET programme was steady-state exercise beginning at 30 minutes at 60% and progressing to 45 minutes at 85% HR max as the test subjects were able. The HIIT protocol was 30 minutes of short bursts, beginning at 10 x 15-second bursts progressing to 15 x 30-second bursts as the test subject was able.
  • In 1996 Tabata published a study demonstrating that 8 bouts of 20 seconds at 170% VO2max with 10 seconds rest in between each set had the same benefits to the aerobic system as 60 minutes of steady-state training at 70% VO2max. However, the HIIT protocol also caused a 28% improvement in anaerobic capacity that was not observed in the low-intensity protocol.
  • Bahr is renowned for his work on increased metabolism following exercise, also known as excess post-exercise oxygen consumption (EPOC). In 2003 he carried out a substantial review of the scientific literature and showed that exercise intensity has a curvilinear relationship with EPOC whereas exercise duration is linear. Increased EPOC for 8-12 hours after intense training periods was common.  In simple terms, you get more bang for your EPOC buck by driving CV intensity up rather than spending longer at moderate intensities.
  • Talanian in 2006 showed that a 2 week (7 sessions) aerobic HIIT training protocol (10 x 4 min, 90% bursts with 2 min rest periods) significantly (up 25%) increased muscle fatty acid oxidation.
  • Trapp in 2008 showed that HIIT training is effective even in overweight deconditioned women as well. A 20-minute cycling HIIT protocol was compared to a 40-minute steady-state cycling regime of the same frequency for 15 weeks. Both groups had similar CV improvements but the HIIT group had significantly greater body fat loss on legs and trunk and improvements in insulin resistance.
  • Boucher in 2010 reviewed the available scientific evidence surrounding HIIT and concluded that while there was valid evidence to show it is more effective at decreasing both subcutaneous and abdominal body fat compared to steady-state training, there is also clear evidence of individual variation in response – not all participants appear to receive the same level of fat loss benefit.
  • Resistance training has also been shown in scientific studies (Melby 1993, Laforgia 1997) to influence EPOC and fat burning when lower volume, higher intensity weight training is utilised in preference to higher volume, moderate resistance work, but the research is still ongoing in this field.

While this is just a brief look at some of the science on HIIT training, it does illustrate that in comparison to steady-state exercise, the benefits of HIIT training are:

  • it may be as good at providing aerobic training benefits
  • it is better a stimulating anaerobic training benefits
  • it significantly improves body fat reduction
  • it increases EPOC for up to 12 hours’ post-training
  • it improves insulin sensitivity to working muscles

It is important to note that the majority of these studies have been performed in a highly controlled environment and most often using a cycle ergometer (bike) or a treadmill. Whilst it is reasonable to assume these benefits may also carry over to other training modalities, such as circuits, group training or resistance work there is much less current evidence to suggest this is true. Perhaps in time the science will more fully support and provide confirmation that HIIT training has a broader application across a range of training modalities with the same beneficial results.

In the meantime, while we wait for science to catch up, it is clear that the many different methods of HIIT training can be great fun, they definitely save on time in the gym and it can deliver a real motivational boost to your training. If it does provide an increased fat burning boost as well, then all the better!

Do you love fitness? Ever thought about making a career out of your passion? Find out more about how you can do that through the Nordic Personal Trainer Certificate from Nordic Fitness education. 

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